In The Beginning There was Makeup: A Look At Ancient Cosmetics

Where did it all start? Though, makeup is new to some cosmetics has been apart of civilizations for years, tens of thousands of years actually. Here are some ancient makeup practices that has evolved into current makeup trends. thanks Cosmeticinfo.org for the invaluable information.

  • In 10,000 BCE They Were...

    Men and women in Egypt use fragrant oils and salves to clean and soften their skin and to hide body odor. Cosmetics were a pivotal part of Egyptian hygiene and health. Oils and creams are used for protection against the hot Egyptian sun and dry winds. Myrrh, thyme, marjoram, chamomile, lavender, lily, peppermint, rosemary, cedar, rose, aloe, olive oil, sesame oil, and almond oil provide the basic ingredients of most perfumes that Egyptians use in religious rituals as well as sacred ceremonies such as weddings and births

  •  Once Upon A Time In 4000 BCE:

    Egyptian women apply galena mesdemet (made of copper and lead ore super unsafe btw) and malachite (bright green paste of copper minerals) to their faces for color and definition. They use a combination of burnt almonds, oxidized copper, different-colored coppers ores, lead, ash, and ochre -- together called kohl -- to adorn the eyes in an almond shape. We use kohl pencils today, which are the best for lining the eyes and lips!

  •   Back In 3000 BCE:

    The Chinese began to stain their fingernails with gum arabic, gelatin, beeswax, and egg. The various colors used represent social class: Chou dynasty royals wore gold and silver, with subsequent royals wearing black or red. Lower classes are forbidden to wear bright colors on their nails. Thank God Makeup is classless today

    Grecian women paint their faces with white lead (yikes!) and apply crushed mulberries as rouge. The application of fake eyebrows, often made of oxen hair, is also fashionable.

     Makeup is historical and healing, for years men and women openly wore makeup to express their regal stature, hide unsavory odors, and more. It's amazing how history repeats itself and how ancient practice are still used today


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